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Preview: Chuck and Nancy are full of it
Bob Salera | January 8, 2019

Hi-

Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi will hit the airwaves tonight whining about immoral border walls to placate their increasingly radicalized party. Before buying into their crocodile tears, keep in mind that both Chuck and Nancy have voted for billions of dollars in funding to physically secure the southern border.

Try as they may, nothing will change the fact that the extremists in the Democratic Party led by Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi held vital government services hostage in their party’s quest for open borders for illegal immigrants.

BACKGROUND:

Nancy Pelosi voted twice to build new barriers along the southern border.

Voted for increased funding for border security fencing (June 1, 2011, Roll Call 387, Poe Amendment to H.R. 2017)

Amendment Text: Amendment increases funding for border security fencing and infrastructure by $10 million offset by a reduction in funding for the Office of the Under Secretary for Management by a similar amount.

NOTE: 122 Democrats voted in favor of the amendment

Voted to provide $1.6 billion for border security, including the construction of new fencing along the border (March 22, 2018, Roll Call 127, H.R. 1625)

From Congressional Quarterly: 

Of that funding, $1.6 billion is for construction of barriers along the U.S. border with Mexico, as part of President Trump’s proposed border “wall.”

Those funds would be used to replace current fencing and construct bollards and levee improvements along about 95 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border, with about 47 miles of new barriers and 48 miles of upgraded barriers, according to the Senate Appropriations Committee. Within that funding, $641 million will be for a new primary pedestrian fencing system along the Rio Grande Valley, $445 million is for replacing existing primary pedestrian fencing, and $251 million is to replace existing secondary fencing near San Diego.

Chuck Schumer voted 8 times to build new barriers along the southwest border.
 
Voted for a minimum of 370 miles of double- and triple-layer fencing and 500 miles of vehicle barriers within 2 years. (May 17, 2006, Senate Vote 126, Sessions S.Amdt. 3604 to H.R. 4939)

Amendment Text: Sessions, R-Ala., amendment no. 3979 would increase the fencing and vehicle barriers along the southwest border of the United States. It would require within two years of enactment the construction of more than 370 miles of triple-layered fencing and 500 miles of vehicle barriers along that border. Existing hardware could be counted towards these totals.

Voted for nearly 700 miles of double-layered fencing along the 2,000-mile Mexican border to prevent illegal immigrants from entering the country (September 29, 2006, Vote Number 262, H.R. 6061)

From Congressional Quarterly: Passage of the bill that would require the Homeland Security Department to authorize the construction of about 700 miles of fencing along the U.S.-Mexican border. The bill would require a study of implementing security systems along the U.S.-Canadian border and direct the agency to evaluate the ability of personnel to stop fleeing vehicles at the border.

Voted for 700 miles of continual fencing with the addition of 300 miles of vehicle barriers and 105 ground-based radar and camera towers along the southwest border (July 26, 2007, Senate Vote 278, S.Amdt. 2480 to S.Amdt. to 2383 to H.R. 2638)

From Congressional Record (Pages S10058-S10115)“Reinforced fencing.–In carrying out subsection (a), the Secretary of Homeland Security shall construct reinforced fencing along not less than 700 miles of the southwest border where fencing would be most practical and effective and provide for the installation of additional physical barriers, roads, lighting, cameras, and sensors to gain operational control of the southwest border.“(B) Priority areas.–In carrying out this section, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall–“(i) identify the 370 miles along the southwest border where fencing would be most practical and effective in deterring smugglers and aliens attempting to gain illegal entry into the United States;”

From Congressional Quarterly: Graham, R-S.C., amendment no. 2480 to the Byrd, D-W.Va., substitute amendment no. 2383. The Graham amendment would provide $3 billion in emergency funding for border security and require the hiring of 23,000 Border Patrol agents. It would require the Homeland Security secretary to establish operational control over 100 percent of the U.S.-Mexico land border, including the installation of 700 miles of fencing and 300 miles of vehicle barriers. It also would require employment eligibility verification improvements for the removal and detention of visa overstays and those who have re-entered the United States illegally. The substitute amendment would provide $37.6 billion in fiscal 2008 for the Homeland Security Department, including $36.4 billion in discretionary spending. The total includes funding for the Coast Guard, the Transportation Security Administration and Customs and Border Protection, including funds for 3,000 new border patrol agents and $1 billion for border fencing, infrastructure, and technology. It also would bar federal pre-emption of more stringent state and local chemical security regulations.

Voted to complete at least 700 miles of reinforced fencing along the southwest border by the end of 2010 (July 8, 2009, Vote Number 220, S.Amdt. 1399 to S.Amdt. 1373 to H.R. 2892)

From the Congressional Records (Page S7172): (Purpose: To require the completion of at least 700 miles of reinforced fencing along the southwest border by December 31, 2010)

At the appropriate place, insert the following: SEC. __. BORDER FENCE COMPLETION. (a) Minimum Requirements.–Section 102(b)(1) of the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (8 U.S.C. 1103 note) is amended–(1) in subparagraph (A), by adding at the end the following: “Fencing that does not effectively restrain pedestrian traffic (such as vehicle barriers and virtual fencing) may not be used to meet the 700-mile fence.”

From Congressional Quarterly: DeMint, R-S.C., amendment no. 1399 to the Reid, D-Nev., substitute amendment no. 1373. The DeMint amendment would require the fence built along the U.S.-Mexican border to prevent pedestrian traffic and reach completion by Dec. 31, 2010. The substitute would provide $44.3 billion in fiscal 2010 for the Homeland Security Department and related programs, including $43 billion in discretionary spending. The total would include $16 billion for customs, border protection and immigration; $7.7 billion for the Transportation Security Administration, including fees; $8.9 billion for the Coast Guard, excluding mandatory spending; $1.5 billion for the Secret Service and $7 billion for FEMA. It also would prohibit funding after Jan. 4, 2010, for Loran-C, a land-based radio navigation system.

Voted to complete at least 700 miles of reinforced fencing. Voted to approve $800 million for border infrastructure and fencing (July 9, 2009, Vote Number 229, H.R. 2892)

From Senate Amendment Text (July 9, 2009)“For expenses for border security fencing, infrastructure, and technology, $800,000,000, to remain available until expended.”

NOTE: The engrossed Senate version included 700 miles of border fencing, excluding pedestrian use, but was not included in the final conference report.

Voted to approve $8 billion to build 700 miles of border fencing (June 26, 2013, Vote Number 163, S.Amdnt 1183 to S. 744)

From Congressional Quarterly: Leahy, D-Vt., amendment no. 1183 that would require the Homeland Security Department to complete certain security measures before illegal immigrants who receive provisional legal status can become permanent residents. It would make available $30 billion for the department to hire 19,200 border control agents, $8 billion to build 700 miles of border fencing and $4.5 billion for technology such as cameras and drones. It would mandate starting removal proceedings for at least 90 percent of visa overstays, or individuals who enter the United States legally but who stay beyond the duration of their visas. It also would prevent immigrants from claiming Social Security benefits for work they did while unauthorized and bar non-citizens from receiving public assistance.

Voted to force the Homeland Security Department to prioritize the construction of 700 miles of fencing, including double-layered fencing, along the southwest border (June 27, 2013, Vote Number 168, S. 744)

From Congressional Quarterly: Passage of a bill that would overhaul U.S. immigration policies, create an incremental path to citizenship for most illegal immigrants in the country and institute new border security measures. It would require the Homeland Security Department to complete certain security measures, including 700 miles of fencing along the southern border, nationwide use of its E-Verify system and a biometric entry-exit system at all international airports and seaports, before illegal immigrants who receive provisional legal status can become permanent residents. It would make available $42.5 billion for additional border control agents, the 700-mile fence and monitoring technology, such as cameras and drones. It would create visa programs for agricultural and low-skilled workers and qualified entrepreneurs, and increase temporary visas available for high-skilled workers from 65,000 to 115,000 annually. The bill would create a program to allocate green cards, up to 250,000 each year, on a merit-based system, with consideration given to family ties in the United States and the country’s economic needs. It would require DHS to annually audit its E-Verify system and begin removal proceedings for at least 90 percent of people who stay beyond the duration of their visas. It also would prevent immigrants from claiming Social Security benefits for work they did while unauthorized and bar non-citizens from receiving public assistance.

Voted for the construction of new fencing along the southern border (March 23, 2018, Senate Vote 63, H.R. 1625)

From Congressional Quarterly: McConnell, R-Ky., motion to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to the bill that would provide roughly $1.3 trillion in funding for federal government operations and services through Sept. 30, 2018. The measure would provide a total of $654.6 billion in additional funding to the Defense Department, including $589.5 billion in discretionary funding and $65.2 billion in funding for the Overseas Contingency Operations account. It would provide $98.7 billion to the Health and Human Services Department, including $5.1 billion to the Food and Drug Administration and $5.5 billion to the Indian Health Service. It would provide $3.4 billion to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for substance abuse block grants, and would provide roughly $3.7 billion to the National Institutes of Health, including an additional $500 million for research into opioid addiction. It would provide $47.7 billion to the Homeland Security Department, including $1.6 billion for the purpose of bolstering security measures on the U.S.-Mexico border, including the construction of new fencing along sections of the border, and would provide $7.1 billion for Immigration and Customs Enforcement operations and enforcement. The measure includes provisions from multiple bills related to school safety and firearms regulations, including a bill (S 2135) that would require the Department of Justice to certify that appropriate records have been submitted to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System by federal agencies and state governments with respect to individuals who are not eligible to purchase firearms. The measure includes language from the bill (S 2495) that would authorize $75 million a year through fiscal 2028 for the Secure Our Schools grant program and would revise it to more explicitly focus the program on preventing student violence.

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